Other countries other manners2018-08-28T11:43:28+00:00

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Other countries, other manners
12 strange laws abroad

Many holidaymakers have come across the most absurd regulations in the distance.

The flight and hotel search engine www. Jetcost.de has put together the most curious bans in the world.
Thus, travelers have a chance not to stumble upon them unprepared.

In the following countries tourists should take special care.

1. Switzerland: No toilet after 22 o’clock

In Switzerland, nocturnal urination is prohibited: the toilet visit must either be postponed until the next day or another, less hygienic solution must be found.

This means that the operation of the toilet flushing is not allowed again until the next morning.
It is also forbidden to pee while standing at a late hour, as – the opinion – the sleep of the neighbors would inevitably be disturbed.

2. Singapore: Chewing Gum only on doctor’s orders

Singapore is one of the cleanest countries in the world. When it was noted in 1992 that the bill of public cleansing due to chewing gum sticking to floors became more and more prevalent, the sale and consumption of the smacking gum was banned.

Since 2004, the ban has been loosened slightly and the Singaporean residents may now chewing gum again – but only on a doctor’s orders. Those who want to quit smoking or complain of indigestion are eligible to purchase.

3. Dubai: kissing prohibited

Dubai is currently one of the most popular honeymooner destinations. However, the newlyweds should be careful where they let their feelings run wild. Kissing in public is forbidden in Dubai because it does not conform to the rules of local culture and customs.

Due to the number of arrested couples, the government has published a booklet informing foreign visitors about respecting certain rules of conduct during their stay. The regulations recall, among other things, that on the street alcohol must not be consumed, nor drunken staggering or dancing, affection statements such as kissing or holding hands are allowed.

In addition, the use of drugs, cursing and the expression of swear words and spitting is not tolerated.

4. Philippines: Frank Sinatra’s “My Way” sing prohibited

In some countries, karaoke is a very serious thing. So serious that there have been serious incidents in the wrongly sung or disrespectful interpretation of some songs.

This is the case, for example, in the Philippines, where Frank Sinatra’s “My Way” was banned in karaoke venues in 2010 because of incidents including murder. Thus, in the last ten years before the ban, there were at least half a dozen organized quarrels that led to the death of the performer of a “miserable version” of the song..

Although the authorities were unable to prove that the deadly quarrels were caused by Sinatra’s song, the press described the deeds as the “My Way Crimes.” What could have been a simple anecdote culminated in a national paranoia: many localities in the country dubbed “My Way” from their song repertoire.

5. Burundi: Collective running not desired

During the civil war, which raged in Burundi from 1993 to 2008, the people in large groups ran to reduce tension and to protect themselves from the dangerous militias.

However, in March 2014, the country’s president, Pierre Nkurunziza, banned running in groups arguing that collective runs were used as a cover of subversive disorder against the government. The law is so strict that it provides for imprisonment. But this only applies to groups, individuals may continue to jog.

6. Turkmenistan: No playback

In Turkmenistan is sung either right or not at all.

In 2005, the government banned playbacks for singers and groups on television shows and cultural events, with the aim of “preserving the country’s authentic culture.”

And since one was already forbidding, one at the same time included the opera and ballet deemed “unnecessary” in the ban.

7. USA: Surprise Eggs Free Zone

The popular and famous surprise eggs of Ferrero are actually banned in the US. The reason: The fear that children could swallow the contents of the surprise in the yellow plastic container.

The law prohibiting any food with integrated toys was issued in 1938, three decades before the appearance of the iconic chocolate ice cream.

So beware of involuntary smuggling on holiday, because, so could www.Jetcost.de find out, the import is punished with $ 2,500 per egg.

8. China: no movies with Time travelers

This ban appears like a fictional fairy tale, but far from it: In China, the viewer must renounce Marty’s time travel, on Arnold Schwarzenegger’s Terminator or on Bruce Willis World Rescue in 12 Monkeys.

Because all these films are about time travel. In China time travel is strictly forbidden in reality as in fiction. The ruling People’s Party of China states that “television dramas should not address characters who move in time and rewrite history, as it runs counter to Chinese history.”

Add to this the lack of “scientific accuracy” in most of the time travel related productions, according to the People’s Party.

9. North Korea: No jeans and piercing

North Korea banned its citizens a few months ago when it came to wearing jeans or piercings.

This is to be understood as a restrictive measure against Western fashion, which accuses Pyongyang of damaging influence on North Korean society. Citizens are monitored and checked by regimental young militias.

The purpose of the mission is “to prevent corruption of public morals and to detect capitalist tendencies based on clothing, such as the skirt length, the shoes, the T-shirt or the hairstyle”.

10. Britain: dying in parliament banned

In the UK, it is forbidden by law to die in parliament because it has the status of Royal Palace. As a result, the deceased person would have the right to receive a state funeral with all the honors of the crown.

For this reason, anyone who suffers from powerlessness or seizures in Parliament will be speedily carried away by the ushers.

And if anyone should come to enter parliament in armor – this is also prohibited.

11. Italy: Sandcastles on the beach undesirable

On the beaches of Eraclea, where many summer tourists travel to find peace and quiet in front of the crowds in neighboring Venice, shovels and pails can be safely left at home:

The construction of sand castles on the beach is not allowed.

Eboli is more concerned about safety at the wheel. The daring driving style presented there has led the authorities to ban any distracting behavior at the wheel.

Under distraction is about kissing in the driver’s compartment, which is punished with 500 €. On Capri, you are more concerned about the tranquility of the neighbors.

The understandable need for noise-free recovery has, however, pushed the authorities to the extreme: two summer tourists were arrested for their smacking summer sandals, which took into account the new ban on “noisy footwear”.

12. Various states in the US: Motorists beware

The United States may well lead the list of the strangest laws and prohibitions, and it goes above all in some traffic rules to the limit of the absurd.

In Alabama, for example, it is forbidden to drive with your eyes closed, but on the other hand it is allowed to drive in a one-way street in the opposite direction, as long as the driver leads a lantern in front.

In Waynesboro, Virginia, women are still not allowed to drive on the main roads. In Tennessee, women are allowed to drive a car, but only as long as a man runs in advance and swings a red flag to alert the other road users to their arrival.

In California, from a speed of 65 mph (105 km / h), the driver is not allowed to jump out of his moving vehicle or even be dressed in a bathrobe.

In Denver, no black cars are allowed to drive on Sundays, while in Georgia, one must not spit out of a moving car or bus, which in turn truck drivers is allowed. And finally, the greatest caution applies when you tie your elephant to a parking meter again, because there the corresponding tariff for a car has to be paid.

And with a gorilla as a passenger you should be careful in Massachusetts: Who caught by the police, must pay a fine.

A contribution with kind permission of the BDAE group

Pictures:
© Sergens Nivens – Fotolia.com
© Pixabay.com

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